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Essentially, both methods of notarisation have identical features. They both require sighting the original document by an Australian public notary, whereby a notarial certificate signed by an Australian public notary is bound by black ribbon & notary seal attached to a sighted document. Also, both methods of notarisation incur the same professional fees. However, the main difference involves what document is bound.

The term ‘notarise true copy of original’ means that an original document is sighted by an Australian public notary and then a true photographic copy of the original document is bound to a notarial certificate signed by an Australian public notary with black ribbon & notary seal. The term ‘original with notarisation’ means that an original document is sighted by an Australian public notary and then the original document is bound to a notarial certificate signed by an Australian public notary with black ribbon & notary seal. The notarial certificate will state all the relevant details necessary for notarisation purposes.

The relevant overseas authority requesting you apostille/attest your document will (or at least should) instruct you of the correct requirements. Most of the time, if you ‘notarise true copy of original’, it will suffice for the relevant overseas authority. However, we do advise that you confer with the relevant overseas authority regarding the method of notarisation required.

If you are unsure about which method of notarisation is required &/or would like more information, please contact us at attestation@bannermans.com.au.

Essentially, original without notarisation (OWN) is where a document is sent directly to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) without a notarial certificate signed by an Australian public notary that’s bound by black ribbon & notary seal attached to it. DFAT instead applies either an apostille stamp (for use in countries that are a party to the Hague Convention) or an authentication stamp (for use in countries that are not a party to the Hague Convention but require further attestation by the relevant Embassy/Consulate in Australia) to the original document. The relevant overseas authority requesting you apostille/attest your document will (or at least should) instruct you of the correct requirements.

Only original Australian university degrees/transcripts, original police certificate issued by the Australian Federal Police & original Australian documents (including birth, death and marriage certificates) issued by Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages can be done through OWN. If someone picks OWN on an ineligible document, DFAT will say to get it notarised & DFAT will not stamp something ineligible. It may also mean you incur additional time, professional fees &/or disbursements to carry out your request. If you are unsure about eligibility for OWN &/or would like more information, please contact us at attestation@bannermans.com.au.

As with all embassies/consulates in Australia, there are certain specific requirements required in order to have documents attested. The Lebanese Consulate is no exception.

For instance, if you are based in NSW, then you must have your documents attested through the Lebanese Consulate in Edgecliff, NSW. If you try to send through your documents to the ACT, they will be returned to you with clear instructions to attest in NSW.

If you require your university testamur/transcript attested, the original document (not notarised true copies of the original documents as these will be rejected) will need to be authenticated by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Sydney, Australia (DFAT) prior to being attested by the Lebanese Consulate. When lodging this request you can either make an appointment to attend the Lebanese Consulate or courier (but not post) the documents to the Lebanese Consulate. Payment must be made by cash.

If you are seeking to have a divorce order from the Family Court of Australia attested, you will need the following documents:

  1. The original divorce order to be authenticated without notarisation by the DFAT;
  2. The original divorce order translated into Arabic (preferably by National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) or Language Services by Multicultural NSW) to be authenticated by the DFAT (with or without notarisation on the original document);
  3. A scanned copy of your passport (please ensure the name on your passport matched with that on the divorce order); and
  4. A power of attorney from Lebanon in Arabic authorising someone to act on your behalf in Lebanon.

Once you have all the relevant documents, you will need to make an appointment to attend the Lebanese Consulate in person.

Bear in mind, requirements can be altered on occasion.

If you do require assistance with attesting documents with the Lebanese Consulate, please contact us at attestation@bannermans.com.au.